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Pooh Bear Pandemic Survival Guide

Pooh Bear Pandemic Survival Guide

A little  bit of Pooh Bear goes a very long way, we hope this makes you smile a little x

1) You’re braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. 

 

Don’t get overwhelmed with the news, and it can create mega anxiety. Be informed, be aware but not alarmed. A positive mindset is always better for your health than a negative one, ask Eeyore. Pooh Bear isn’t the only one; increasing evidence suggests that positive affect may be especially beneficial for people in the midst of severe stress.  

 

EH Shepard Pooh Bear Ponderings Magazine
EH Shepard Pooh Bear Ponderings Magazine

2. Sometimes the smallest things take up the most room in your heart. 

Isolation has taught us so much; particularly in the western world. What we value, what we miss and what we need and don’t need is just a start. Our children are small, but their futures are big! 

3. I wasn’t going to eat it; I was just going to taste it. 

Nothing else needed here. Just pause and reflect. (too soon?) 

4) A hug is always the right size.

Hugs, how important is human touch and contact? Never underestimate a hug until you can’t give one. Then never underestimate the ability it can have to turn from a gesture of love to a vehicle for a virus. Hang onto those hugs people, then when you can hug the stuffing out of people. 

5) If you live to be a hundred, I hope I live to be a hundred minus one day, so that I never have to live a day without you.

Don’t spare a minute, if you are sorry; say sorry. If you miss someone; tell them. If you care, say it. If you think someone is wonderful; tell them. People are unique, every single one of them. Regrets are like honey pots you left on an ant nest. 

 

It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like, ‘What about lunch?’

6) Governments, spokespeople- please keep it simple. Please don’t confuse us. KISS method works well always. Keeping it Simple is Sophisticated.  

7) You can’t stay in your corner of the Forest waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes. 

Think outside the square and think for yourself, help a neighbour, a relative or someone you don’t even know. The most wonderful things can happen when you look outside your corner.

EH Shepard Pooh Bear Ponderings Magazine
EH Shepard Pooh Bear Ponderings Magazine

8) Always watch where you are going. Otherwise, you may step on a piece of the Forest that was left out by mistake.  

Think for yourself, friend, and be discerning. For you may journey into the territory of someone you are not supposed to, use your words carefully, for they are steps that may stumble onto another person’s heart. In times of global stress, our words in person and online can become breadcrumbs baked from the loaf of fear and frustration. 

9) How lucky am I to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard?

 

Pain is sometimes the price we pay for love and freedom. Because the magical thing is; love and freedom never die, they change postcode, they morph, hide, turn into a new feeling. The level can change intensity, but they do not die. Value freedom and love always, for when they increase, we appreciate them more than before. States of mind build the foundations of the heart. 

10) With a little dash of Eyeore for good measure- They’re funny things accidents, you never have them until you have them. 

Be safe, go gentle, be kind and be patient. A person’s humanity is only tested in times of trial and tribulation. 

With thanks to the glorious works of A.A Milne and the illlustrations of E.H Shepard

 

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Narnia, A Faraway Tree with a smidge of a Doc called Suess, and some Kahlil Gibran is the word charm that grew seeds in Kirsten Macdonald's imagination. She has an innate curiosity about the stories of "us" and a deep faith that is strongly supported by a dark sense of humour. Ask this wordsmith about anthropology, ancient religions, the curious nature of humanity and the incredible cuteness of sloths and you will have a conversation for hours. Writer, editor and researcher, Kirsten has developed Ponderings into a space that is now shared by a team and a shared vision that is infectiously positive and forged in good stuff.

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The Dichotomy Of Love In A World of Impermanence

The Dichotomy Of Love In A World of Impermanence

The Dichotomy Of Love In A World of Impermanence

Written by Kate Dulhunty Guest Ponderer

June 5, 2020

I’m an anxious lover. Hyper-vigilant in many moments. 

 

In vain, I drape this identity around my neck. I know why I’m like this, and it’s for these reasons I’ll want to hold you just as close as I’ll want to keep you far away.

Twenty twenty would be the year I’d turn 30 and do a whole lot of things. I’d convert a van, bend myself through a 21-day yoga teacher training and travel to a few more continents – all while freelancing. And then Covid-19 absorbed these plans, and I lost my steady freelance income. I ended up living in a coastal town in Victoria, where I’d spend the isolation period.

For the first time in a long time, I had little to do and lots of delicious time to spend in the potency of moments. Even the flightiest of moments became the only ‘ever-inhabitable’ places I could comprehend. I’d started seeing someone too, and restrictions on who we could see meant I was in something steady and accidentally monogamous – something I’d been avoiding for some time.

Ponderings Magazine Image by stuart hampton from Pixabay

Photo credit Kate Delhunty

I met him at his yard sale in Bondi when I was 19. He was selling vintage, and I was in town to see a gig. 

It took us two years, until when we’d both moved to Melbourne, to finally go for ‘that drink’. I don’t remember much about the date, just a feeling.

There was no kiss, no follow up. I liked him, but my past experiences told me he was too kind; suspiciously calming.

During the two years between meeting him and going on a date, I was in a relationship with someone who became abusive. I kept it quiet for a long time, as people didn’t quite know what to say.

A new friend of mine once responded, ‘I can’t imagine you in a relationship like that’, and I reflected on how abuse and violence were somewhat normalised in my upbringing. The three women who raised me – my mum, my step-mum and my sister – had each been in abusive relationships during my lifetime.

Relationships and abuse arrived snugly arm in arm to pleasant occasions and, to me, love was tender like a new bruise.

It wasn’t the mistreatment that made me want to leave the abusive relationship I was in. 

 

I wanted to move away, travel alone and feel life’s depths without him, on my terms. For years after, I fed the spark that stayed alight with quick fixes and cheap thrills. I lived many short lives until post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety slipped into places I thought he could never reach, including new relationships. 

 

Ponderings Magazine Image by Anton Sjölander from Pixabay

Photo credit Kate Delhunty

In dating situations, I was deeply anxious… avoidant at times. 

I’d wear it like a cloak made of the fur of a slaughtered animal to avoid closeness or a state of vulnerability. I made PTSD and anxiety part of my identity. While it was very real, I fashioned it so that it suited me when I wanted. With it, I escaped the permanence I feared. 

 

While managing my mental health has become a priority over the last few years, my lovelife in 2019 involved a self-destructive safety net of people I could ‘see’… something I’d sabotage potential relationships with. So this thing, this accidental monogamous thing I was in during isolation, felt unfamiliar. 

 

Somehow, I adapted and softened to a routine of buttery banana bread and Seinfeld and wine and walks and sex and ciggies with the babe I’d met in Bondi eleven years earlier.

And then, restrictions began to ease and the person I’d spent so many slow mornings with returned to work and opened his own vintage store.

I remained unemployed, without a safety net, and I anxiously craved comfort that what we’d developed would survive the isolation period.

Impermanence was prevalent and painful, as palpable as fleshy touch, and harder to escape than the permanence I’d formerly been fearing.

A dichotomy of surrender and self-preservation emerged: how to immortalise this intimacy with someone while also keeping my sense of self?

 

Ponderings Magazine Image by Mia Ganzenberg from Pixabay

Photo credit Kate Delhunty

How do I keep anxiety at bay, insecurities from seeping in?

Was there a lesson on permanence to be learnt from 2020’s abrupt derailing of plans and its demand for us to adapt to isolation and then the just-as-sudden attempted return to ‘normal’? Was there any comfort in guarantee? Was there ever?

Is ‘guarantee’ a convenient illusion? In a time of restricted living, I began to ignore the limitations caused by the trauma-informed identity I’d created.

Only ever now, I repeat to myself. Because flights get cancelled. Viruses mutate. Restrictions lift. Intimacy and moments drip through fingers like glorified pearlescent goo. Love, plans, states of being – everything – can only ever be held like they are now.

 I hold myself upright and admit: ‘alright 2020, you big sci-fi fruitcake of a year, I’m with you now.’ I admit that I’m an anxious lover, but I no longer want to wear it like protective fur over my collarbones.

I don’t want my life to be determined by the meaning I give to my past traumas, the false permanence I give my identity. There’s a soothing safety in the quality of holding something – anything of this gorgeous world – just as close as keeping it far away, and looking at it like it’s brand new, and about to slip away.

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Secret Messages – What You See Is Not What You Always Get

Secret Messages – What You See Is Not What You Always Get

Secret Messages – What You See Is Not What You Always Get

Image for Ponderings Magazine

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

June 2, 2020

Let me paint you a picture. Two people are in a combative stance. 

 

You are all at a BBQ (no more than 10 of course) and these two are clearly unhappy, but there is no yelling. You can see something is up. How so? It has to do with all of the information you may be getting about the scene. So what are you picking up on? Most likely, you are witnessing and making discerning decisions about their body language along with the tone they are using and any preconceived knowledge you have of them. 

Ponderings Magazine Image
Image for Ponderings Magazine

On closer inspection as you move closer to the chips and french onion dip you notice they are indeed having a bit of a verbal stoush. 

One person’s words you note are not overtly triggering or upsetting, but there is an undertone. So what is going on? The quirky morsel to observe is the circular tread of the conversation; they agree with each other to a degree. So why so tense?

 

Welcome to the Mehrabian rule! 

These perceptions are very intricate; there is evidence to suggest decision making is often a subconscious action.

Born in Iran in the brutal and tragic Armenian genocidal hangover of 1939, Professor Emeritus of Psychology Albert Mehrabian is somewhat revered for his 7-38-55 rule. Mehrabian’s groundbreaking research and publications were extensive; however, his work on verbal and non-verbal messages became the tightly held tools of negotiators, FBI agencies and more recently business coaches across the globe. 

 

 

Now living and teaching in California USA, the Prof’s rule gave some remarkably juicy insights into human behaviour. 

The rule states that 7 % meaning is communicated through spoken word, 38 % through the tone of voice, and 55 % via body language. 

Total Liking = 7% Verbal Liking + 38% Vocal Liking + 55% Facial Liking. 

Mehrabian’s work was all about what he called the ‘silent messages’ – how people communicate their intent – what they really mean non-verbally. 

As Dr Nick Morman, says in Debunking The DebunkersWe get most of our clues of the emotional intent behind people’s words from non-verbal sources. And when the two conflict, we believe the non-verbal every time.” 

In other words, (pardon the pun) when I am speaking to someone and what they are saying is not matching the rest of their “output” I will rely on the non-verbal information more so.

 We never come to an interaction with another human without preconceived ideas. We are the result of our learning and experiences, the social cues we pick up and learn along the way are our complex resource for perceiving others, and plot twist: it is NOT always correct. 

These perceptions are very intricate; there is evidence to suggest decision making is often a subconscious action. 

We also have body language and tone quirks that will give away what we really think or believe more so than what we are saying. 

Remember the saying; the smile doesn’t match the eyes? Instant suspicion may be induced and a feeling of mistrust or weariness when we get this vibe from someone. The more discerning we become, the more powerful we are at reading these messages. 

Ponderings Magazine Image by analogicus from Pixabay

You may have read in my other articles I was blind for a time after brain surgery in 2012. 

Well, I can tell you this event removed 35 years of social cue learning of the non-verbal kind. Unable to observe gestures or facial expressions made it impossible to understand social nuances how I normally would. To begin with, it was frustrating; however, I soon gleaned the tone of voice of others in a life-changing way. 

Our bodies are a work of engineering prowess. When blindness occurs often a substantial structural reorganization of the brain happens, wherein the parts of the brain typically specialized for vision are recruited for the processing of stimuli in other modalities. I know, right? 

Some studies suggest that blind persons may possess “supra-normal” nonvisual sensory capabilities, as a result of either perceptual learning (Gagnon, Ismaili, Ptito, & Kupers, 2015) or the reorganization of various brain areas. For the unlearned “supra-normal” means: transcending the normal: greater than expected or usual. 

I know, it is pretty awesome. What you see is NOT what you always get. 

References for further reading and resources used:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486861/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486861/#CR14
https://www.psych.ucla.edu/faculty/page/mehrab  

Supranormal.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/supranormal. Accessed 1 Jun. 2020.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080414145705.htm

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Narnia, A Faraway Tree with a smidge of a Doc called Suess, and some Kahlil Gibran is the word charm that grew seeds in Kirsten Macdonald's imagination. She has an innate curiosity about the stories of "us" and a deep faith that is strongly supported by a dark sense of humour. Ask this wordsmith about anthropology, ancient religions, the curious nature of humanity and the incredible cuteness of sloths and you will have a conversation for hours. Writer, editor and researcher, Kirsten has developed Ponderings into a space that is now shared by a team and a shared vision that is infectiously positive and forged in good stuff.

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Are We Born With Emotional Intelligence?

Are We Born With Emotional Intelligence?

Are We Born With Emotional Intelligence?

Kristy Hunter For Ponderings Magazine

Written by Kristy Hunter - Guest Ponderer

June 1, 2020

What is Emotional intelligence? 

Understanding EQ (Emotional Quotient/Emotional Intelligence) is a concept that was initially made popular by psychologist Daniel Goleman. In his book written in the mid-’90s, Goleman identified 5 key pillars of EQ; 5 key characteristics of a person that determined their EQ.   

 

What are the 5 pillars of EQ? 

In short, they are Self Awareness, Self Regulation, Motivation, Empathy and Social Skills.

 

Image for Ponderings
Image for Ponderings Magazine

Am I born with EQ, or can I develop the skills/characteristics? 

The answer is both. We are all born with different personalities and character traits. Some of us may possess the character traits of empathy and social skills as part of our natural person. These character traits are not black/white assets, rather sit on a spectrum of grey – like most things human! Some people will possess large amounts of empathy, others less.

Whether we are born with natural energy and motivation or not, we are born with a brain we can use to teach and train ourselves when we choose to set an intention.  

Why would I want to develop my Emotional Quotient? 

Since becoming popularised, much research has been conducted surrounding EQ. Having high EQ has been directly correlated with “success” in life, studies indicating that in some situations EQ can be much more important than IQ.

Defining success is difficult; however, I’m mainly referring to people who are happier, healthier and have functional relationships – these are the people who have a higher EQ than their unhappier counterparts. 

I also work with several organisations to help them recruit people based mainly on EQ because it is well recognised that people with high EQ make great teammates and leaders.

Being able to receive constructive feedback is a crucial skill of someone with EQ! 

 

How do I develop my EQ? 

By making a decision and setting an intention for yourself. Living intentionally is something I talk about A LOT (Just ask my students or clients – insert eye roll emoji here). If we don’t live intentionally, we can meander along a path that leads to who knows where? As humans, we can choose our behaviour, choose our attitude and choose our direction – why wouldn’t we decide to go in a positive direction for ourselves and those in relationship with us? 

If you want to develop your EQ, assess your character, attitude and behaviour in each of the 5 pillars – self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills. 

If you want a truly objective assessment, ask your partner or closest friends/family for feedback! 

 

 

Once you have a realistic assessment, set some goals in each attitude and behaviour, of things you are going to choose to think and do. For example, to increase my empathy, I am going to choose to ask two work colleagues how they are, and genuinely listen and engage in their answer. 

Or to improve my social skills, I am going to choose to introduce myself, even though I don’t feel comfortable or natural doing that.

I could talk about this stuff for days! It is challenging to condense into a short article. If you would like to learn more about developing your EQ, head to my website where you can read/watch some more detailed blogs that will help you. Feel welcome to contact me if you would like me to come and speak at your next work or team event.  

 

 

Kristy Hunter For Ponderings Magazine

Written by Kristy Hunter -Guest Ponderer

Resolution Conflict Expert and Workplace Leadership Consultant

Kristy Hunter is the golden expert in conflict resolution and driver for emotional growth and wellbeing. A leadership mentor and workplace consultant, this is one no BS  authentic human and we welcome her to Ponderings.

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Help! There’s a Meteor In My Garden!

Help! There’s a Meteor In My Garden!

Help! There’s a Meteor In My Garden!

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

May 23, 2020

I watched a dandelion yesterday as I sat in the garden, all its small fluffy seeds floated away in the wind.

I watched it until I couldn’t see it anymore. Such a simple act induced a feeling of calm, of wonder, and my inner child was content. Wondering where each of those small seeds might fly to, perhaps the seeds might drift onto the withered hand of a man in a nursing home, out for his morning sun.

Maybe they might flutter down onto the nose of a cow as she licks the dew from her calf? *sigh* They might get sniffed up my nose and make me sneeze and choke until I place so much pressure on my lower intestines I fart a little. God only knows. *whoops*

The uncertainty is real. Perhaps these little fluff delights get sucked into space and transform into micro flaming meteors smashing back down in my garden. 

There are so many things in life we believe we have control over, and power is a coping mechanism. When in fact, our circle of control is much smaller than we think albeit powerful in that smallness. Anything can happen at any time, so when you live for the moment, you live in reality. You can plan for the future at the moment, and you can reflect on past hurts and transform them in the moment. However, living in the moment and being lead very intuitively with what our needs are in this time and space creates some incredible action. 

 

Perhaps someone very dear to you just left your world, and you have absolutely no idea what life looks like without them in it physically. 

Here are some things I have learned- Uncertainties in life are guaranteed.

 

Some are larger than others. One moment everything is going ok, the next BAM- you are having a seizure and being told you have multiple micro haemorrhages in your noggin.

You may find yourself in life a position where someone else has to shower you, dress you or feed you. But you have control inside the possibilities of what you CAN do.

You may be waiting for a job offer to come through, a house loan, a house sale, a romantic text message, a cancer-diagnosis. Anything at any moment can potentially tip your life upside down. That Uncertainty seed can grow branches of frustration, limitations, fear, hasty decision making, forcing a situation, sleepless nights and destructive action, extreme stress and illness- to name a few.  No longer a seed, it is a lava shit-show permeating every section of your life setting it ablaze with embers you cannot put out – IF YOU ALLOW THEM. 

Uncertainty can become less imposing and more of a curiosity and a place for possibility about to unfold. But to experience this kind of relief, we need to take the situation, place it in our hand, turn it over and examine it a little. Because once you understand the way it affects you when it makes an impact, life starts to get really interesting. It certainly can relieve some of the pressure. Because uncertainty can cause pain, and pain needs relief, right?

 

Pain can be dealt with the way it is supposed to be, as a teacher and growth accelerator.

Joy doesn’t have to claw its way up from the mire stuck down in between our busy lives like coins in a couch sofa. Joy can bubble and burst through like a happy surprise daily. Deep feelings of calm, grace, and grounded surety can be felt in your bones. Note: there is room in life for sadness and melancholy, but only a little.

Uncertainty, the perceived loss of control and limbo can be torturous and horror-filled depending where it sits on the scale.

It’s all up to you. Our personalities show up when these meteors hit. What does is it telling us? 

Alarm clocks sound to wake us up. What we do when we realise we are awake is up to all of us. Do we give ourselves permission to be still and seek out the simple things in life? Or do we get out and smash life with a gusto that is a powerful force to be reckoned with? Neither is wrong, both when lived without bullshit and high doses of “real” are the tickets to your adventure. For example, you may be so busy busy busy you are multi-tasking and accidentally send a rambunctious naughty message designed to make your sister laugh to a Facebook stranger selling potato sacks. This can happen. No control over that one, or maybe the busy part. Hmmm. Pondering…

 

First, we must pause. Rebelling internally or externally against pausing is putting off pulling the thorns from your feet, ignoring the meteors burning your life down.  

When we delve into a pause, sometimes we don’t like what we find there. 

Exploring our monsters and fears can bring great gifts of understanding. Understanding means clarity. To be honest about ourselves requires courage. Monsters aren’t always out to eat our hearts, sometimes they need a cuddle, and their fangs need a trim. The truth is, there are so many elements of information to which we don’t always have access. Situations sometimes need to show us more or alter before we can see them for what they indeed are. 

Unhurried hands and minds make the best meals from scratch, tell the best bedtime stories, write beautiful music and see the colours in a sunset for the beauty they are designed for,  and allow the balance to course through the body and mind. 

We need to engage our Visual (see), Auditory (hear), Kinesthetic (feel), Olfactory (smell), Gustatory (taste) and Soul (soul) senses to be present. Take a breath in, what can you smell, see, hear, feel, taste? This is how you experience life. 

 

You can be as resilient as flint and ready to set the world on fire when you ease into the pause. 

So seek out any tools you need to help scaffold your process. Resources are important. A listening ear, keeping a journal, perhaps a Youtube inspirer who resonates with you will be good for the soul to help soothe it from being woken up so abruptly. But whatever you do, don’t go back to sleep. 

It is time to choose your adventure, and the answers may come while watching a dandelion. 

If you liked reading this, you might like to listen to more about Uncertainty and Kirsten over at Podcast One’s Hometruths. To listen – CLICK HERE. 

 

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Narnia, A Faraway Tree with a smidge of a Doc called Suess, and some Kahlil Gibran is the word charm that grew seeds in Kirsten Macdonald's imagination. She has an innate curiosity about the stories of "us" and a deep faith that is strongly supported by a dark sense of humour. Ask this wordsmith about anthropology, ancient religions, the curious nature of humanity and the incredible cuteness of sloths and you will have a conversation for hours. Writer, editor and researcher, Kirsten has developed Ponderings into a space that is now shared by a team and a shared vision that is infectiously positive and forged in good stuff.

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Fractal Patterns, Elsa and Why Exercise In Iso Might Be Better Than You Think

Fractal Patterns, Elsa and Why Exercise In Iso Might Be Better Than You Think

Fractal Patterns, Elsa and Why Exercise In Iso Might Be Better Than You Think

Written by Sarah Healy - Exercise Physiologist

If you’re on social media at the moment then I’m sure you have seen numerous personal trainers, famous or otherwise, giving away their home workouts for free. 

Amazing right? They are a great way of keeping you moving during the lockdown. But have they enticed you to use your active-wear for good and follow their lead? 

If these sessions aren’t for you, what else can you do? At this point, we are still able to head outside for some physical activity as long as we follow the social distancing rules. From my experience, it’s one of my favourite parts of my day. Whether I’m with my husband and three kids or going solo, I love heading out of the house, breathing in the fresh air and increasing heart rate. I always feel clearer and calmer returning home. 

There is so much more outside to observe too. In nature, there are many examples of fractals – repeating identical patterns, or similar such as leaves, flowers and ocean waves. Exposure to these fractal patterns has been shown to reduce people’s levels of stress by up to 60%? 

Why wouldn’t we go outside? 

It’s not the only way exercise improves our wellbeing. Research has repeatedly shown the multiple benefits of regular exercise such as

  • Improved immune function
  • Reduced stress and anxiety
  • Improved cognitive function
  • Improved sleep quality
  • Decreased risk of most chronic disease
  • Reduced inflammation in the body
  • Boost in mental health

and its never too late to start. 

At this point, it’s essential to find time to exercise because you may be missing out on the incidental exercise that used to be a part of our day. 

Bonus fun fact: did you know that Elsa sings about fractals in the Frozen song ‘Let it Go’? I know! You’re welcome.

The best way to create a new habit is to piggyback it onto another habit. 

How often each day do you boil the kettle, check the news or social media? Try attaching an exercise to each of these activities. Squats with social media, calf raises when checking the news, steps ups after coming in from hanging up the washing. Simple short bursts of exercise throughout our day can help to keep us alert and feeling calmer. Something is always better than nothing.

If you are looking for a free online exercise class, try as many as you can and look outside the square from the usual program if they aren’t enjoyable. 

Live-streamed dance classes have been really popular because they can be fun as a virtual dance party or yoga for the meditative qualities. If you feel like you need something more individualized than find an Exercise Physiologist that have moved their service to online telehealth appointments. 

There are so many options that we can do within our own four walls but if you are lucky enough to be able to leave those four walls for some restorative exercise outside, then do it!

Sarah Healy is an Exercise Physiologist, with knowledge and skills to implement exercise interventions for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, disabilities or injuries. In other words- she knows stuff! This beach dweller loves cooking, is partial to an excellent tea and mountain bike riding in nature sets her heart to happy mode. A published writer, Sarah understands and is passionate about helping people prevent injury and get moving. 

Sarah’s background in coaching gymnastics fuelled a career that is impressively highly qualified. A Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Movement and a Grad Dip in Exercise for Rehabilitation, with a variety of Certifications.

You can contact Sarah at https://wholebodyhealthandwellness.com.au/practitioners

 

 

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