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Gen Anthems That Rocked Our World  Part 2: 1960s-1990s

Gen Anthems That Rocked Our World Part 2: 1960s-1990s

Written by Montanna Macdonald

Here at Ponderings, we have brought together the generational hits of the western world in a three-part series.

Highlighting the political discourse and issues of the time, the art form of music as a communication platform for social change is evident throughout our history.

These artists have succeeded and confronted the many facets of revolutionary, culturally challenging ideas and civil movements for the greater good of a collective human feeling. In Part 2, we will be exploring the 1960s to the 1990s and their music scenes. 

 

1960’s

 

Dominating the 1960’s is the protest for social change in the American Civil Rights Movement, one of the most iconic eras for art being an expression of oppression and racial prejudice. We see anthems emerge in this era, from artists like Bob Dylan, Sam Cooke, Joan Baez, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, Peter Seeger, Buffalo Springfield and even in the UK, the Beatles.  

Not only in America, but the Australian Civil rights movement is emerging in the 1960s, fighting for Aboriginal rights, including the 1967 Referendum which called for two discriminating references to change in the constitution.

We see from the 1960s to the 1990s many famous songs dedicated to the Indigenous civil rights movement, native title to land and the hardships of the stolen generation. Songs include: 

  • Kev Carmody and Paul Kelly’s ‘From Big Things Little Things Grow’ (1993, which is about Gurundiji people strike),
  •  ‘Took the Children Away’ by Archie Roach (1990), 
  • Shane Howard’s ‘Solid Rock’ (1982), 
  • The Yothu Yindi’s ‘Treaty’ (1991), and 
  • ‘Black Fella/White Fella’ by the Warumpi Band (1985). 

A special mention to Kev Carmody’s and Pual Kelly From Big Things Little Things Grow, it still to this day has a significant impact, listen and watch this cover by Electric Fields released last month. 

This version of Shane Howards Solid Rock (Puli Kunpungka) was recorded for the songs 30th Anniversary with famous Indigenous artists. It was not released until the closure of climbing Uluru in 2019. 

 

Australia’s music scene changed forever from Jazz to garage rock bands once the Beatles toured Australia in 1964. We see the emergence of an iconic Australian rock sound, inspired by Rolling Stones and the Beatles, including the Easybeats, The Atlantics, the Bee Jees, The Aztecs, The Groop and more. 

Fun fact, Fireworks (1967) by Val Stephen, was the first piece of electronic music released internationally by an Australian composer. 

1970’s

 

The ’70s is the era of third-wave feminism protest and recognition of global war-torn prejudice. We see female pop stars, like Australian Helen Reddy in America, fighting to break female gender roles, sexism and the right to vote.

We also hear anti-war cries for world peace from John Lennon influenced by the Vietnam War and civil movement in Zimbabwe and Jamaica from government oppression and lack of human rights by artists like Wells Fargo and Bob Marley. Another political action emerges surrounding protecting the environment, with popular anthems like Big Yellow Taxi by Joni Mitchell and Beds are Burning by Midnight Oil. 

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Rock n Roll Aussie bands start making it big time in the 70s, including ACDC, Daddy Cool, The Angels, Johny O’Keefe, Radio Birdman, The Master Apprentices, Skyhooks and The Boys Next Door. An iconic era for the formation of unique Australian music culture. 

 

1980’s-1990’s  

Put on your skates and your eyeliner, because we have just entered the era of disco, dance-pop and grunge. The biggest global musical legends were born into fame in the 1980s including David Bowie, Elton John, Queen and also our Australian friends, ACDC, INXS and the Bee Gees. 

The 1980s and 1990s in Australia are iconic for number 1’s in pop, rock and Aussie country, with acts like Kylie Minogue, Australian Crawl, Tina Arena, John Farnham, Daryl Braithwaite, Icehouse, Jimmy Barnes, Slim Dusty, Silverchair, Twelfth Man, Savage Garden, the Moving Pictures, Rick Springfield and Men at Work. 

Equally, we see songs dedicated to protesting. A variety of agendas are lyrically shared, including anti-war songs, modern-day slavery, violence against unarmed protestors in Northern Ireland, AIDS research and funding, the reunification of Germany, the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, peace songs, the Indigenous Gurindji Strike in Northern Territory and so much more. Big names like U2, Crowded House, Dolly Parton, Paul Kelly and Bob Marley go down in the hall of fame.

 

We also need to make a special mention of the evolution of International live satellite TV and the influence this had on music. Prince Charles and Princess Diana opened The Live Aid benefit concert in 1985 in London, created by Midge Ure and Bob Geldof to raise funds in the fight against the Ethiopian famine.

This saw the world’s biggest acts, including Bowie, Queen, U2, The Who and more perform. Not only in the UK, but concerts were live linked all around the globe, including in Philadelphia, Canada, Australia, Russia, West-Germany and Japan via our TV screens. To date, this was one of the largest satellite television broadcasts in history and had an accumulative audience estimation of 1.9billion, which is nearly 40% of the world population. The Live Aid concert raised a total of $127 million for famine relief. 

To listen to many of the songs that rocked our world, you can listen to Pondering’s  Music Playlist here! 

 

 

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Gen Anthems That Rocked Our World Part 2: 1960s-1990s

Here at Ponderings, we have brought together the generational hits of the western world in a three-part series.

Gen Anthems That Rocked Our World Part 1: 1920s-1950s

From the 1920s to the 2020s, from Blues, Jazz, swing, pop, rock, reggae, rap and everything in between, here at Ponderings we have brought together the generational hits of the western world in a three-part series.

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Its Life Jim But Not As We Know It- The Cool Tech Stuff Making ISO Easier

Its Life Jim But Not As We Know It- The Cool Tech Stuff Making ISO Easier

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

2020 has bought some surprises, and tech has never been more important. We peek at some of the tools, innovations and ideas that have showcased brilliant out of the box thinking in living, music and health. 

When we attended the Pausefest business festival in early 2020 guest speaker, Dom Price from Atlassian made some stunning predictions. The global whiz company make tools like Trello and Jira, along with customized collaboration platforms. 

So what did Dom Price, Atlassian work futurist predict? Well, he mentioned a new wave of productivity wasn’t too far away, with teams working from their homes instead of sterile office spaces with sharp efficiency. We all smiled and thought it too far out of reach. But it seems the future thinkers at Atlassian are touched with the golden gift of insight when the future came hurtling through the front door quicker than you can say Pandemic. In a new survey commissioned by Atlassian, 96 per cent of respondents stated that some or all of their employees have transitioned to working remotely due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. 

Along with the likes of Atlassian, some wonderful innovators are seeking to connect and improve people’s lives. Amongst them is Next Address. 

 

 

The real estate selling platform has been winning hearts now for a few years; Next Address is at its core in an exciting bid to place the power of buying and selling homes into the hands of the people.

Using next-level tech, the company founded by Julie O’Donohue has an extensive listing all over Australia thanks to their closely held secret marketing algorithm and sales results. However, it is their virtual tech systems that have rocketed into popularity since COVID hit. 

Julie says; “Virtual Technology creates powerful user interactions and social experiences, all with the goal to generate a positive impact.”

Cleverly named; the NextReality3D technology allows you to virtually walk through a house, conducting an inspection from your chair!

All the elements of the property are extracted using a smart tech camera and its pure genius. From isolation or interstate, people can inspect homes and get more of a real aspect of the property that you cannot achieve with photos or a clever promo video. Check it out for yourself here: https://nextaddress.com.au/property/15-cluny-road-armidale-nsw-2350-23296

Virtual tours – tick! Now, what about some Yoga or self-discovery? 

 

One very special place adapting their sails to the wind to extend help to others is the Rocklyn Ashram.

Settled in the beauty of Wombat State forest in Victoria, Rocklyn Ashram has been a sacred place for schools, VCE students, Backpackers, CEOS, Doctors, Nurses, Mothers, Fathers, Grandparents and Retirees for well over 4o year. Every walk of human has passed through those doors from around the world.

A traditional Ashram, it is a destination for global specialists, botanists and horticulturalists with the drawcard of simplicity away from the rat race. 

With COVID came restrictions on visitors to the Ashram seeking solace and retreat. The very forward-thinking Yoginis have recreated a whole variety of classes and lessons online using a combination of their platform, Facebook and Zoom; however, the home retreat via Zoom was the one that caught our eye.

With classes live streaming to homes all over the country, the retreat aims to help offer some stability and routine each day, a regularity and re-establishment of daily practice. If you are in isolation and seeking to glean some peace and self-exploration along with balance, this is a beautiful and affordable way to do so. 

With offerings of Yoga, Yoga Nidra, Meditation and Asana, there are 3-4 online classes a day along with guidance from instructors. Click here for more details. 

AshramRocklynVictoria by Kirsten Macdonald Ponderings Magazine Australia
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What about Music? The musical arts have certainly taken a hit with tours, performances and festivals being canned quicker than you can say BoyBand. 

However, in true form, many musos have risen to the occasion thinking outside the box to deliver music to their fans. Facebook live concerts, the ABC Sound series, Youtube and Instagram have become the new dance halls. However, there is one more delightful la tribune that has really amped things up; MIXLR. 

MIXLR kicked off in 2010 by Londoner Rob Watson. A live social platform, MIXLR users can push out their live audio feed. In other words; create your own radio station!

We are big fangs of Fangradio- Neil Finn’s MIXLR station. Sublime, personal and brilliant; Neils rendition of Prince’s classic When Dove’s Cry is on repeat in the Ponderings office (Heroes by Bowie is pretty bloody amazing too) 

Perhaps the charm comes from being able to watch while the Crowded House legend strums it out with the mic on the table cloth, notes and headphones, but I am guessing it is more than a hint of musical genius. You can use the playback feature or play live; the choice is yours. Check it out here: https://www.neilfinn.com/fangradio

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Narnia, A Faraway Tree with a smidge of a Doc called Suess, and some Kahlil Gibran is the word charm that grew seeds in Kirsten Macdonald's imagination. She has an innate curiosity about the stories of "us" and a deep faith that is strongly supported by a dark sense of humour. Ask this wordsmith about anthropology, ancient religions, the curious nature of humanity and the incredible cuteness of sloths and you will have a conversation for hours. Writer, editor and researcher, Kirsten has developed Ponderings into a space that is now shared by a team and a shared vision that is infectiously positive and forged in good stuff.

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A Nibble on Philosophy and The Soul Part Four- Berkeley

A Nibble on Philosophy and The Soul Part Four- Berkeley

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Welcome to Part 4 of Ponderings Nibble on the Soul, an unashamedly reductionalist peekaboo at one of the greats: Berkeley.

George Berkeley was a priest of the Church of Ireland and one of the three most famous British Empiricists.  

Berkeley is best known for his early works on vision and metaphysics; a field of philosophy that is generally focused on how reality and the universe began.

In the Principles and the Three Dialogues Berkeley champions two metaphysical discourses: idealism (everything that exists either is a mind or needs a mind to exist) and immaterialism (matter does not exist). 

If we do not see a tree if we do not use a tree, then does the tree exist? Or if a tree falls in a forest and nobody is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Our perception of what a tree is gives it form according to George. 

Berkley’s argument that every physical object is actually a collection of ideas is reflected in his motto esse is percipi (to be is to be perceived). 

If ideas are understood to be objects of knowledge, then there must be something that “knows or perceives them, and operates them, remembering them and willing.” 

Berkeley calls this ‘mind’ or ‘spirit’. Minds (as knowers) are distinct from ideas (as things are known). For an idea, to be is to be perceived (known). Since this holds for ideas in general, it holds for “sensations or ideas imprinted on the sense” in particular. 

 This article, for example, doesn’t actually exist, it is a construction of your mind. 

According to George, there is something indeed behind the thinktank, driving it and helping it to create form. Ordinary objects are nothing but collections of ideas, he proposed, and there are only two kinds of things: spirits and ideas. Spirits are simple active beings producing and perceiving thoughts, ideas are passive beings which are created and perceived by spirits.

The truth is perfect and eternal, but cannot found in the world of matter, only through the mind. The world of matter is imperfect and constantly changing. 

If you smash a table to pieces, will it cease to exist? No, because the memory of it still exists in your mind so therefore it still exists in some way. The idea of it makes it so. 

Incredibly complex, George’s thinking was nothing short of a gold winning Gymnast defying the laws of gravity and walking tiptoe on the roof holding a powder puff as walking stick. He liked backgammon. Imagine playing Cluedo wih him? Yikes. 

 

Hmmm. 

 

References:

(An Essay towards a New Theory of Vision, 1709)

(A Treatise concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, 1710; Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, 1713). 

Berkeley, George | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. https://iep.utm.edu/berkeley/

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Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Narnia, A Faraway Tree with a smidge of a Doc called Suess, and some Kahlil Gibran is the word charm that grew seeds in Kirsten Macdonald's imagination. She has an innate curiosity about the stories of "us" and a deep faith that is strongly supported by a dark sense of humour. Ask this wordsmith about anthropology, ancient religions, the curious nature of humanity and the incredible cuteness of sloths and you will have a conversation for hours. Writer, editor and researcher, Kirsten has developed Ponderings into a space that is now shared by a team and a shared vision that is infectiously positive and forged in good stuff.

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The Revolutionary Scar Treatments Helping Aussies

The Revolutionary Scar Treatments Helping Aussies

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

The introduction of new tech into mainstream clinics is making procedures for scar reduction more accessible. This is a welcome relief for many Australian’s with issues of scarring. 

According to the Cosmetic Physicians College of Australasia, Australians were spending more than 1 billion dollars a year on minimal or non-invasive cosmetic procedures. However, while people are choosing cosmetic procedures to enhance their physical features, it is scar reduction treatment that is presenting exciting treatment options. 

Dr Ian Holten, a prominent plastic surgeon, travels globally assisting with reconstructive surgeries, along with life-saving surgeries through his affiliation with volunteer doctor organisations. He says the psychological perspective of patients with scarring cannot be underestimated. As Dr. Holten has witnessed, the significant psychological impact of scarring is heavy.

According to a report on Cutaneous Scarring patients affected by major scars, particularly children, suffer from long-term functional and psychological problems. 

“The introduction of advancements in scar reduction means we can help people feel good about themselves. Scars can deeply impact a person’s confidence and their sense of wellbeing, causing anxiety and deeply impacting emotional trauma,” says Dr Holten. 

Those with scars undergo remodelling of their emotional state and are more prone to the development of depression and anxiety; feelings of shame and aggression can follow says a report by the University of Maryland- titled the Psychology of Scars.

“The reduction in downtime, more pain-free options and affordability makes procedures more accessible than before. The less trauma inflicted on the skin and the person, the better the outcome” says Holten.

Dr Holten and his extensive team of surgeons and clinicians offer services in skin checks and skin cancer, a very serious issue facing many Aussies. 

Skin cancer removal, acne scarring, unwanted tattoos and congenital skin discolouration and burns are examples of skin issues people are seeking help for. 

 

“We have seen some terrible cases of people who have had large and deep surface areas of their skin chopped out for skin cancer removal. Early detection of skin cancers can not only save lives but also reduce the heavy scarring associated with cancers needing surgical removal. This is all thanks to technology advancements” says Dr Holten. 

Early intervention and the introduction of treatments like Photodynamic therapy (PDT) means less scarring and earlier assistance. PDT is a light-based therapy targeted at pre-cancerous lesions, acne and rosacea or damaged and impaired skin cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment that uses a specific wavelength of light, producing a form of oxygen that kills nearby cells. This is not to mention the help for early intervention in skin cancer, which accounts for around 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers in Australia. Likewise, the PICO laser treatment for tattoo removal and acne scar removal has revolutionised the way scars are treated.

The future is looking bright as we look to advancements, says Holten. 

Watch this space! 

 

For more information about Australian Skin Face Body Click Here

 

Written by Kirsten Macdonald

Narnia, A Faraway Tree with a smidge of a Doc called Suess, and some Kahlil Gibran is the word charm that grew seeds in Kirsten Macdonald's imagination. She has an innate curiosity about the stories of "us" and a deep faith that is strongly supported by a dark sense of humour. Ask this wordsmith about anthropology, ancient religions, the curious nature of humanity and the incredible cuteness of sloths and you will have a conversation for hours. Writer, editor and researcher, Kirsten has developed Ponderings into a space that is now shared by a team and a shared vision that is infectiously positive and forged in good stuff.

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Subscribe & Support Positive stortelling

Support our mission to write and produce Positive Stortelling, it takes a tribe to build one. We donate $2 from every subscription to Vision Australia

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