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Written by Renae Failla

June 18, 2020

In the 1700s, Gin rose to prominence among the ‘inferior class’ as Distillers started production at a low cost making gin one of the most accessible and cheapest drinks you could get your hands on at the time. In addition to this around a quarter of households in London began making their own gin.

A Gin & Tonic a Day Keeps the Doctor Away – The Introduction of Gin & Tonic

Just like your Vodka Lime Sodas or a Tequila Sunrise, the Gin and Tonic is one of the easiest cocktails to make and is pretty much foolproof making it a favourite for dinner parties.

The English – India introduction of the drink was not as simple, with a deep rooted history in medicinal advancements at the time and the British invasion of India during war time.

Interestingly, it was invented as a guise to trick soldiers into taking quinine, a bitter powder derived from cinchona bark used to treat the malaria disease spreading at the time and is now a regular ingredient in tonic water.

Some soldiers were so put off by the taste of quinine that they preferred to die.

JAX Tyres for Ponderings

Why is it so popular now?

While Gin rose to prominence in England in the 1700’s, it has since become a common drink of choice in Australia. And one of the biggest gin trends in Australia in the last decade has been the introduction of craft distilleries – making gin in very small batches, sometimes considered ‘limited edition’.

Below are some of our Australian favourites hailing from each state:

 

Victoria – Four Pillars Gin

This distillery is located in the Yarra Valley and launched in 2013. One of the first craft distillers to produce gin in Australia.

Named the best Gin in the world in 2019 at International Gin Producer of the Year at the 50th Annual Wine and Spirits Competition in London- this is one very impressive distiller.

https://www.fourpillarsgin.com.au

Instagram: @fourpillarsgin

South Australia – Ambleside Distillers

This South Australian distillery uses the traditional method of single run vapour infused distillation infused with botanicals. Made in picturesque Hahndorf in the Adelaide hills, this award winning gin will have your mouth watering with the decadent descriptions.

https://www.amblesidedistillers.com/ambleside-at-home/

Instagram: @amblesidedistillers

Queensland –  Kalki Moon Gin

Created by Bunderberg distillery, the Kalki Moon Gin won gold at the Australian Distilled Spirits Awards in 2019.

The Kalki brand has won multiple awards at the Australian Distilled Spirits Competition in Melbourne, winning Gold, Silver and Bronze for their range. 

https://www.kalkimoon.com

Instagram: @kalkimooncompany

New South Wales – Archie Rose

Hailing from the distillery considered ‘Australia’s most highly awarded distillery’, Archie rose produces a dry gin whose bold flavours work well with tonic. In this gin you will also be able to taste hints of honey – originating from Archie Rose’s very own rooftop beehives.

The very cool aspect of this Gin Distiller? You can customise your Gin, pick the style, flavours, cask type, get it labelled with your name on it and sent to you!

https://archierose.com.au

Instagram: @archierosesyd

Western Australia – The West Winds

This Premium Australian gin is a London Style Dry Gin that derived its name from the wind the sailors used to push themselves to the shores of Australia.

Awards: Gold & Champion Gin – Australian Distilled Spirits Awards 2015; Gold Medal – San Francisco Spirits Competition 2011

https://thewestwindsgin.com

Instagram: @thewestwindsgin

Tasmania – Forty Spotted Gin

This gin is a London Dry Gin and is considered a ‘rare find’ taking its name from a rare bird that has 40 spots and can only be found in Tasmania. Made with Australian Mountain Pepper Berry, this is highly sought after.

https://fortyspotted.com

Instagram: @fortyspottedgin

And now knowing the intricate origins of gin and reaching the end of iso with 20 people in each restaurant, it’s time to settle down and try the most popular gins from each state – G&T anyone?

References:

Ernest L. Abel, THE GIN EPIDEMIC: MUCH ADO ABOUT WHAT?, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 36, Issue 5, September 2001, Pages 401–405, https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/36.5.401

https://www.danmurphys.com.au/liquor-library/spirits/more-about-spirits/australian-gin

 

Written by Renae Failla

Renae Lauren’s writing flair and experience reads like an eclectic menu of finesse. The Marketing Coordinator and serial blogger has communications and media prowess with a love for fashion, travel and Italian fine food. 

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