Socks and Sandals To Help The Homeless

Socks and Sandals To Help The Homeless

Underworks has partnered with the Salvation Army, who together are on a mission to provide socks to those experiencing homelessness. #igiveasock is trending around Australia and its exciting to see an family business doing their bit. 

 

Jasmin Pedretti

Jasmin Pedretti

Journalist

Socks and thongs are a combo NOT made in heaven and neither is being displaced or homeless. 

This month, Australian family business Underworks is encouraging us to embrace this fashion faux pas to bring awareness to homelessness. They have partnered with the Salvation Army to provide a pair of warm, comfy socks to those that need it most. The mission is to help the thousands of homeless Australians who do not have access to this simple necessity that we may take for granted.  

All you need to do is upload a photo of yourself posing in socks n’ thongs (or sandals) to Instagram, along with the hashtag #igiveasock and the tag @underworksaustralia. 

With every post, a pair of socks will be donated to someone who needs it. The goal is to deliver 20,000 pairs of socks, which is almost half of Australia’s youth homelessness and a fifth of Australia’s total homeless population (2018 Census). 

Socks might not seem like much, but they are incredibly important. In fact, they are the most requested item by local shelters and least donated. Wet socks breed bacteria which causes infection. Not only this but wearing socks with holes decreases a person’s self-confidence, feeling of self-worth and motivation to seek employment. 

 

The Salvation Army Major, Brendan Nottle says that there is an increasing number of people who do not have access to clean socks. 

“In our experience working on the streets, we have seen an increasing number of people with serious foot diseases. Even worse, we have seen people lose their feet and, in some cases, lose their lives because they cannot access clean socks” says Brendan. 

A donated pair of socks will help keep people warm this winter, improve hygiene and health, and ultimately save lives. We think its worth posting a quirky pic for. 

Underworks has been keeping our tootsies warm and stylish with quality socks since 1999. They are one of Australia’s largest sock companies with a reputation for excellence.  

For this cause, they will be distributing a one-size-fits-all pair of socks made from premium excess yarns with a unique design to protect the feet from the elements.

Plus, Underworks have ensured minimised fabric waste, so the earth does not suffer. These brand-new socks have been specifically designed for the cause. 

Underworks founder and CEO Sam Todaro says:

“I Give A Sock is all about giving and offering some warmth to those who need it most. We’re proud to help make a difference.” 

You can help make a difference too. Instead of your usual selfie post, show that you give a sock and post something that will have a significant impact on someone’s life. The quirkier, the better!

 

Let us all embrace our inner bogan, put on our finest pair of socks n’ thongs and wear them with pride.

 

This is the perfect excuse to shake the dust off those rainbow-striped toe socks you have hiding in your drawer and give them the chance to shine for an unbelievable cause.       

 

You can track how many socks have been donated so far, here

Want to become a VIPonderer?

 

What started as a blog about one human and her path has become a storytelling hub for authors and wordsmiths all over the world, a new digital magazine that is one of a kind. It now runs on goodwill, blood sweat and tears of a team with a vision for a new wave of journalism, volunteers and staff, and the generosity of the subscribers, donors and sponsors who fund the vision. But we need your help!

WE ARE GOING INTO PRINT! We will be printing our first Anthology copy in November. To keep the dream alive, we have started a subscription.

You are rewarded with a copy of Your Ponderings Anthology Magazine will be delivered to you and we have partnered with some awesome big brands who are giving us monthly shopping sales and discounts for our VIPonderers. Each story will be sent to your inbox directly the moment it is published. The subscription is $24.95 for a year.

Independent Media is fiercely critical; it means no large media giant is pulling our strings or dictating what we write. Ponderings provides an alternative to networked media, producing stories about issues of social justice and humanity; that might not otherwise be told. Some you will need no introduction and some you will be uplifted to find out about and be inspired by. This year, in particular, our lineup is going to delight and surprise you.

Your annual subscription fee will help us continue to run this passion project and you become a member of a genuine community with rewards from those that believe in what we are doing.

 

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Libby Trickett, the Woman Behind the Hero

Libby Trickett, the Woman Behind the Hero

We ponder with one of Australia’s most beloved Olympic champions, Libby Trickett. Talking mental health, life-lessons and most embarrassing moments.    

Jasmin Pedretti

Jasmin Pedretti

Journalist

As one of Australia’s great Olympic champions, we have seen Libby Trickett battle it out in the pool. What we have not seen are the battles with depression that have led her to become an ambassador for Beyond Blue and R U OK?

Behind her beaming smile and warm personality, is a woman who has suffered feelings of severe hopelessness.

However, there is so much more to her narrative. This interview unravels Libby’s quirks and complexities and the wisdom she has learnt from the challenges she has faced and overcome.

You lead your life by example, and it is such a positive one for young women. If you could give your 18-year-old self one piece of golden positive wisdom, what would it be?

It’s probably quite cliché, but I would say you are enough. You don’t need to impress or be something that other people might want you to be. Being yourself is worthy enough. All the things you’ve worked through and achieved mean something. They’re all for a purpose, and although maybe you don’t see it at that time, it all turns out for the best in the long run. 

What are your secret indulgences? 

Ok, this is my dirty little secret. I’m obsessed with true crime. To the point where I’m getting concerned about myself. Anything I can find. Whether it’s on Netflix or a podcast. 

Who is the coolest person you have ever met? 

Meeting Prince William was very exciting and terrifying, I completely muffled my greeting. All you’re supposed to say is “it’s lovely to meet you Your Royal Highness”. I had verbal diarrhoea. The words just fell out of my mouth in no particular order, and then I laughed awkwardly. He was lovely about it, which made me feel less idiotic. I mean he wouldn’t remember me from a bar of soap.

What has been the funniest moment in your swimming career?

When I was about 15, I was standing on the block, and there was a bee buzzing around my head. I tried to swat at it but lost my footing and ended up slipping in such a way that I ended up falling sideways and found myself straddling the lane rope. Not funny at all at the time but it’s quite hilarious looking back on it. The whole squad was there laughing.

On a more serious note, you have struggled with your own mental health over the years. What helped you recover? 

Talking about it has been an essential part of my healing process, especially after post-natal depression. I consider myself strong and independent, but I recognised that motherhood is inherently hard. Regardless if you have a unicorn baby that sleeps 12 hours a night, the different challenges and guilt that comes with parenting is difficult. 

For me, as soon as I started talking about it, the response I received was amazing. Without talking about it, you can feel isolated because you don’t see how many other people are struggling and you wonder why you’re the only one not coping. That’s why if you look at my Instagram, most of it’s just poking fun at parenthood. 

I think it’s important to show that truth and realness because that’s part of the beauty of life as well. It’s not all perfectly curated Instagram accounts, it’s the rawness and the realness that makes life textured and layered and colourful. Social media can be such a terrible thing in terms of creating low self-esteem. 

But on the flip-side, there are these wonderful communities that can be so positive, and I certainly feel lucky with my Instagram, because I’ve received nothing but kindness from people that I may never meet physically in person. 

How has your experience with depression affected your relationships? 

They’ve become stronger. I know that the relationship with my husband Luke has just gone from strength to strength because we communicate. We talk about our fears.

 

When someone with depression reaches out, it can be hard to know what the right thing to say is. What do you recommend? 

 

That’s part of the reason why I’ve been part of Beyond Blue and R U Ok? They have incredible resources. Don’t underestimate asking ‘are you okay’? Maybe the person isn’t ready to talk, but simply showing that you’re there and that you care, is incredibly powerful for the person that might be struggling. Equally as important is listening unconditionally. Not trying to fix them, just listening to what they’re experiencing. The next thing you can do is follow up. Often, we’re like, ‘ok I’ve asked, tick, they said they were fine, they must be fine’.

If you ask again, they might be ready to talk. 

Do you know someone who might need to talk or perhaps you are experiencing feelings you are unsure about or that are creating anxiety in your life. Click HERE TO CONTACT BEYOND BLUE and HERE TO RUOK. 

The Healthy Happy Guide To Self Care by Kim Morrison

Seriously next level, Kim Morrison founder of organic Aromatherapy company Twenty8, unpacks the seceret to self care and it is anything but typical.

Want to become a VIPonderer?

 

What started as a blog about one human and her path has become a storytelling hub for authors and wordsmiths all over the world, a new digital magazine that is one of a kind. It now runs on goodwill, blood sweat and tears of a team with a vision for a new wave of journalism, volunteers and staff, and the generosity of the subscribers, donors and sponsors who fund the vision. But we need your help!

WE ARE GOING INTO PRINT! We will be printing our first Anthology copy in November. To keep the dream alive, we have started a subscription.

You are rewarded with a copy of Your Ponderings Anthology Magazine will be delivered to you and we have partnered with some awesome big brands who are giving us monthly shopping sales and discounts for our VIPonderers. Each story will be sent to your inbox directly the moment it is published. The subscription is $24.95 for a year.

Independent Media is fiercely critical; it means no large media giant is pulling our strings or dictating what we write. Ponderings provides an alternative to networked media, producing stories about issues of social justice and humanity; that might not otherwise be told. Some you will need no introduction and some you will be uplifted to find out about and be inspired by. This year, in particular, our lineup is going to delight and surprise you.

Your annual subscription fee will help us continue to run this passion project and you become a member of a genuine community with rewards from those that believe in what we are doing.

 

Yes I want to support Ponderings and subscribe

$24.95 AU per year 


The Warrior, the Compass and the Fight for Truth

The Warrior, the Compass and the Fight for Truth

A medical system in crisis, and one doctor’s fight to restore the moral compass. We unpack the issues with Paddy Dewan and put an invitation out to the Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt…

 

There are archetypal roles in human history, representing and maintaining the “moral compass” aspect of our human collectiveness. 

Shaman, Cleverman, Kung, Elder, Healer,  Judge, Psychologist, Nun, Yogini, Pastor, Rabbi, Journalist, the list of these intended guarding personages goes on. They all share a common fibre; people have looked to them to show us the way, to set the example and uphold safety, truth and care for the good of each other.  One such very admired role is that of Doctor.

The learned person who cares for the vulnerable and ill. Yet according to many in the field, it is becoming frighteningly apparent in many Australian medical establishments, the rose of the medical compass is faltering, no longer pointing North but rather  bending towards closed doors.

Yet there are those who are relentless in their dedication, these warrior types who continue to strive and fight to uphold the ideal, climbing through the trenches onward to navigate treacherous roads for the people left broken hearted and left wanting.

Missiles and words from colleagues are thrown, twitter grenades are launched and the very processes needed to keep the soles on their warrior shoes and continue the roles they have worked so hard for are being stripped away. 

 

People are hurting. This is real.

The hand on heart promise to ‘remember that there is an art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug. I will not be ashamed to say “I know not,” nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient’s recovery.” These are the words formed so long ago adopted and adapted all over the world. The Oath of the Doctor. 

Vulnerability, accountability and tough conversations are no longer the growth tanks from which new ideas and ways spring forth. Instead of peer reviews, tainted news reports waxing lyrical into the hearts and minds of the general public seek to control the wheel.  The puppet strings are pulled by the powers to be, and brilliant journalists are haunting the halls with silenced mouths, and empty pens.

An underground smattering of Doctors and patients afraid to speak up and operate, patient’s heartbreaking -purposefully buried beneath a decaying process that may have lost its way. 

The inability for Surgeon Dr. Paddy Dewan to perform a life-saving operation in a public hospital because he has upheld his oath in favour of kowtowing to the people who have forgotten the face of their teachers. 

A surgeon banned from working in a host of public hospitals, not because he is not brilliant at what he does, it is because he says, he has tried to hold people accountable for mistakes, to make sure they don’t happen again.  

Yet people like Paddy are accused of the very thing they fight against- power and ego.   

There are not enough walls to fill the qualifications, I have never seen so many in one space. Then there are the photos, photos of happy kids and smiling parents. He fights day in day out from a tiny office in Sunshine, with old lino and bare of the glitz and glamour of the Eastern Suburbs. He is a globally respected surgeon, he runs a successful charity called Kind Cuts for Kids, helping save lives of children in developing countries and he gives a shit. 

Courage is a tangible and often instinctive response to a threat or a need to protect others, how do you believe it is forged? 

I was walking with my nephew many years ago, in a paddock. We were going to dig for worms beside a dam. I looked at my hand on the long-handled shovel as I raised it in the air and thrust it in the direction of his foot. I cut off the head of a snake that was just next to him, between the two of us.  

My primitive brain saw, heard and directed the message to the action centre, bypassing the white-matter neocortex that is much slower.  When it comes to the survival instinct in my medical career, I obviously prefer the primitive pleasure of the joy of the family to the strategy of ensuring you ingratiate oneself to colleagues – I probably would have died early in the German times of Hitler or the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia.

Courage is also demanding physically and mentally when it is an ongoing requirement to work in your field – where do you find the guts to keep going? 

Like the real Patch Adams, I get my inner strength from the families I assist. He rang me a few years ago after one of “my” families arranged for him to come to a charity function in Sydney. He said, “Hi Paddy, its Patch here. I gather your system is as fucked up as ours”. I agreed!  His phone call that day was an inspiration.

When the protectors and the lifesavers are desperately trying to uphold the moral compass when their intention is PEOPLE and not power or ego, what can they do to help you, what can everyday people do? Democracy is built on the tribe having a say in their rights. 

I am an everyday person; I am a plumber, a boy from the bush but, I roar like a tiger when I see injustice in medicine. If everyday people informed themselves, then reacted, we would have a better world. Others can contact their politicians, contact the regulator and make those that are advocating for them feel they are not alone. 

The problem is that most are self-interested – once the champion has solved their problem, they lose interest in the problem they have created for the champion.

You are brave, and you are human, not infallible and not emotionally bulletproof, when you read and hear negative comments from peers and the institution you have invested time, education and faith in, what does that feel like? 

Such negative comments led to me writing “Look the Tiger in the eye”, while in the witness box.  I am reminded of the father who punched the door when I said his boy needed an operation – because he was so angry with the neglect of others. In the VCAT courtroom, the AHPRA barrister was presenting a barrage of negative comments about me.

That very same father stood up quite fiercely and said: “I am not listening to this fu**ing bullshit any more”.  

I am also reminded about Lindy Chamberlain, then I go and use a chainsaw or build a fence, or go to a developing country. Sometimes I am angry, but these days I feel more resolved than angry.

 

What does it feel like to hear positive and endearing commentary from peers and those who believe in you and what you do each day, preserving health- what does that feel like? 

I love hearing the positive comments, and more-so, I enjoy the positive body language. The look and behaviour of friendship, thanks and caring. This is everything. 

What do you believe drives a person to protect their career more than the care and life of a person?  

Human nature! Selfishness, money, greed, a lack of caring. Often it seems that those who are better at protecting their career have less clinical skills. Within organisations, it appears that those who are not a performance-comparison threat are more likely to be promoted.

The opinions of others are none of your business, and yet they seek to destroy and hurt. What is your go to, to help equalise and keep you focussed on your life and your life’s work?  

Writing Poetry, dancing, some art and furniture making, farming, a 1962 Fordson supermajor tractor, developing country visits, my Australian patients and, last but far from least, my wife, Padma.  I blame Rudyard Kipling!

What does your family love most about you? 

Standing at the kitchen bench typing, as Padma says, “my multiple abilities” – so I remind her I fixed the heating yesterday.

Were you a rebel when you were younger or have you been forced into the perceived role of rebel rather than simply being someone trying to do their job? 

I was the “father” in the family home. I learnt to cook and clean had an after-school job and was top of my class. I was good friends with all the teachers and had great friends from all backgrounds.  At university, I had little money so wasn’t a pub lad, but couldn’t afford haircuts. But I could dance, which was a bit radical – it certainly didn’t make me popular with the guys!

Then in Ireland, I experienced medicine by the spin doctor (which led me to do a PhD to prove what many were saying was “product driven medicine”.)  Then on return to Australia, I found poor standards accepted, false indications for surgery supported. I was soon elevated to the status of a radical when I refused to accept certain events.

I have been presented by the media as a radical as a way of them supporting the poor standards of the regulator, VCAT, the coroner, medical administrators and other surgeons.

Is the moral cost to you submitting to the system trying to force your hand higher than the one to keep going and fighting?  

Absolutely, a German officer was quoted to say – something like – If you have a difficult decision to make, look to consider the worst possible outcome of what seems the right decision and, if you can tolerate the consequences, then make the morally correct decision.

If we imagine humanity as a linear story – if you had to choose just one person as the protagonist for choosing good over conformity who would it be? 

Nelson Mandela – his time in prison reminds me of the little time since 2003 when I lost my position at a major hospital for choosing justice over conformity.

Favourite photograph and why? 

The wedding photo of Padma and I standing by the water of the Woolshed falls, which is on the creek. Our wedding was on the land on which my great-grandparent looked for gold (5 acres),  near Beechworth.

We purchased that land, and a little more, on the 10th anniversary of our wedding, on the anniversary of my mothers birthday (23rd May), which was one of our two weddings, the other was on the 50th anniversary of Padma’s parents’ wedding, on 20th June (Padma and I will exchange crystal on Thursday).

We both love the wonderfully romantic story of our two weddings.

Documentary or Netflix binge when travelling? If so, which one do you recommend? 

I NEVER watch television when I travel; I watch an occasional movie on a plane – I often crying during movies. But if I was to binge it would be on documentaries.

What irritates you more, losing a sock or being late? 

I have a system of keeping track of “one-tys” so that never worries me. And I love mending them, I call it “cycling” (as compared to recycling). I prefer not to be late but relax in a traffic jam.  

Are there other people like yourself believing in upholding the moral compass within our institutions that strive as you do regardless of the threat to their credibility and reputation? 

Yes, I have met some of them via the Healthcare Excellence Institute Australia – Jane Bannan and Jane Tolman, for instance.

How does it feel when a patient celebrates a birthday because you were brave enough to do an operation or find an anomaly that helps promote life? 

Interestingly, this question reminds me of the occasions where I have helped families come to terms with the death of their child. On a visit to PNG, I saw a boy with a big lump on his chest wall. He was about 10 yo.

The next day I saw the family with a chest x-ray that indicated he had a terminal illness. I said in my broken PNG language, “him buggarup algetter” which implied he would die from the illness. They said as I was almost in tears, “we are happy that God has given him to use for 10 good years”. 

During the same trip, a judge and his wife were losing their boy to kidney cancer, while he was on his death bed, they were phoning Europe to chase more refined histological interpretation and were falling apart.

The first family taught me how to cope with death, and has helped me teach other families around the world. Not from a religious perspective, from the importance of knowing what can be changed, and accepting it. And, knowing you have saved a life and enabled another birthday celebration is amazing.

How does it feel when a person is diagnosed correctly after misdiagnosis?  

Lucky; the more I practice, the luckier I get; the more I listen, the more I know.

Do you cry very much? 

Usually while watching “call the midwife”, and while watching “Invictus”, the movie. Sometimes when flying away from the countries, I have gone to treat kids in developing countries – tears of joy really.

How hard is it to separate your emotions when you like a patient? 

I like most of my patients. Operating on someone is a very personal thing, with great responsibility. Maybe it is like a pianist and the piano – great music can be created, great admiration for the instrument,  

Is there a legislative action that can be taken to protect those that seek to protect us? 

We do not have free speech in Australia; the media publish to a formula, not in the pursuit of truth and many politicians are liars and cheats. 

What is the point of difference between you and the Doctor who looks a patient and their family in the eye and says “there’s nothing we can do” when in fact they know there is and they know they are being influenced by peers and boards to say no?

I once wrote a poem called “you child becomes mine”, which says it all – just by the title. Others seem to have the attitude that if something went wrong and they were not on-call, it was not their problem. The best example was when I was a registrar in Dunedin. A fellow trainee had operated on a man in his forties for varicose veins.

While operating in the back of the knee, he injured the main vein of the leg. When he was called to suggest he come to help fix the damage, he refused “because he was not on-call”. He got away with what I thought was unthinkable behaviour.

Are there many others like you that have seen the character assassination and are frightened to make a stand? 

Yes and there will be more!  I work on our farm, volunteer overseas and review coronial cases and report adverse events to the surgeon, the hospital involved and the regulator. I give expert opinion in coronial cases, spend time organising meetings to review the regulatory process, and remain determined to make medicine safer.

Are you a hindered lifesaver? 

Yes and No. As a result of the Australian political rubbish, I have made a huge difference in developing countries.

If you could tell the Australian public one compelling aspect you wish they knew about our current medical establishment, what would it be? 

Education of the public to enable them to get the best health outcome for their children is not a priority and combined with a failure to listen to and respect parents results in overtreatment, undertreatment and adverse events. I invite the Health Minister to sit down with me to discuss the coronial process and regulations, the system is broken and this is not getting taken seriously. 

Dr. Paddy Dewan’s eyes light up when he speaks of his charity, his love of helping others and the curious nature of those possessed by ego. Every day he marches on, fighting for the rights of Australian’s to have access to truthful medical care. We have pondered with him and its the kind of ponder that you leave better than when you started. 

So – Hon Greg Hunt MP will you ponder with Dr. Paddy Dewan? Are you prepared to sit down and listen to a man dedicated to the oath he took and the protection of the integrity of our medical system and those whom you represent? 

Want to become a VIPonderer?

 

What started as a blog about one human and her path has become a storytelling hub for authors and wordsmiths all over the world, a new digital magazine that is one of a kind. It now runs on goodwill, blood sweat and tears of a team with a vision for a new wave of journalism, volunteers and staff, and the generosity of the subscribers, donors and sponsors who fund the vision. But we need your help!

WE ARE GOING INTO PRINT! We will be printing our first Anthology copy in November. To keep the dream alive, we have started a subscription.

You are rewarded with a copy of Your Ponderings Anthology Magazine will be delivered to you and we have partnered with some awesome big brands who are giving us monthly shopping sales and discounts for our VIPonderers. Each story will be sent to your inbox directly the moment it is published. The subscription is $24.95 for a year.

Independent Media is fiercely critical; it means no large media giant is pulling our strings or dictating what we write. Ponderings provides an alternative to networked media, producing stories about issues of social justice and humanity; that might not otherwise be told. Some you will need no introduction and some you will be uplifted to find out about and be inspired by. This year, in particular, our lineup is going to delight and surprise you.

Your annual subscription fee will help us continue to run this passion project and you become a member of a genuine community with rewards from those that believe in what we are doing.

 

Yes I want to support Ponderings and subscribe

$24.95 AU per year 


The Anti-Self-Help Books that Are Actually Helpful

The Anti-Self-Help Books that Are Actually Helpful

Self-help books can be a great source of encouragement, but they can also be idealistic bullshit.

Sometimes you just don’t need the “how to be a high-achiever” and “say yes to everything” crap. Love you Socrates, but what the hell am I supposed to do with “the only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing”.

Anti-self-help books rip up the rule-books and give you real, straightforward advice on how to live your best life. And sometimes it’s as simple as not giving a f*ck. 

Here are some of the world’s best-selling anti-self-help books. 

Anti-self help- quirky phase or wickedly intriguing insights? We check out the top 6 and give you the run down, by Jasmin Pedretti. 

Jasmin Pedretti

Jasmin Pedretti

Journalist

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*Ck by Mark Manson

Forget everything you think you know and let Manson slap you in the face with the secret to a good life. Instead of worrying so much, find one thing that gives you meaning and devote all your fu*ks to it. This saves a whole lot of time and energy. Find that ‘thing’ that aligns with your personal values so you can stop searching for happiness and just accept your wonderful life as it is.

The Courage to be Disliked by Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga

Learn about the theories of the 19th-century philosopher, Alfred Adler, by eavesdropping on a chit-chat between a philosopher and a young boy. The theory is that you can determine your own destiny as long as you dare to live free of the shackles of other’s expectations. Essentially, don’t stress if everyone hates you because being disliked is proof that you are living according to your own principles. 

You Do You by Sarah Knight

Finally, a book that tells you to worry more about yourself and encourages you to fuck up. It might sound counterintuitive. In fact, it sounds like a guide on how to be a selfish mess. But the reality is, looking out for yourself and embracing your imperfections and shitty mistakes can be the answer to happiness. Don’t worry about what everyone expects of you. Make mistakes, bounce back, and continue being your own kick-ass self.  

How Not to Be a Dick: An Everyday Etiquette Guide by Meghan Doherty

An ‘etiquette guide’ does not sound funny or remotely fun to read. However, this is different. It’s basically a how-to-not-be-a-dick guide in a world inevitably filled with dicks. It offers practical tips for navigating 21st-century social situations through comedy and 1940’s retro-style illustrations. You know when the first line of the book is “throughout history, there have been dicks”, you’re in for a good laugh and real-talk advice. 

 

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book about Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

Lawson uses disjointed, blog-like points to explain how to cling onto your mental stability by your fingernails. Her no-nonsense collection of confused thoughts explores her own personal battle with mental illness. Her advice is to take those “fine” moments and make them “amazing” because they are the moments that we take into battle to fight depression. She says to find joy in being outrageous because craziness isn’t all that bad.

Have you read one of these wonders of wisdom? If so we would love to hear about it! Take a pic of your fave Anti-Self Help and use #ponderingsbook. 

Want to become a VIPonderer?

 

What started as a blog about one human and her path has become a storytelling hub for authors and wordsmiths all over the world, a new digital magazine that is one of a kind. It now runs on goodwill, blood sweat and tears of a team with a vision for a new wave of journalism, volunteers and staff, and the generosity of the subscribers, donors and sponsors who fund the vision. But we need your help!

WE ARE GOING INTO PRINT! We will be printing our first Anthology copy in November. To keep the dream alive, we have started a subscription.

You are rewarded with a copy of Your Ponderings Anthology Magazine will be delivered to you and we have partnered with some awesome big brands who are giving us monthly shopping sales and discounts for our VIPonderers. Each story will be sent to your inbox directly the moment it is published. The subscription is $24.95 for a year.

Independent Media is fiercely critical; it means no large media giant is pulling our strings or dictating what we write. Ponderings provides an alternative to networked media, producing stories about issues of social justice and humanity; that might not otherwise be told. Some you will need no introduction and some you will be uplifted to find out about and be inspired by. This year, in particular, our lineup is going to delight and surprise you.

Your annual subscription fee will help us continue to run this passion project and you become a member of a genuine community with rewards from those that believe in what we are doing.

 

Yes I want to support Ponderings and subscribe

$24.95 AU per year 


Exercise Myths, Activewear and Do You Want Coffee With That?

Exercise Myths, Activewear and Do You Want Coffee With That?

Sarah Healy Exercise Myths Ponderings Magazine

Sarah Healy physiologist and columnist unpacks the myths about exercise and gets straight to the point!

Extra flexible people are double jointed – Nope, not a thing in humans.

 

Joints can be hypermobile, but there are definitely no extra joints in there! In fact, hypermobility features joints that easily move beyond the normal range expected for that particular joint. Which can be very handy for the contortionist and party trick, but alas, not an extra joint in sight!

 

Running is bad for your knees –

 

Research has found recreational runners have a lower risk of developing osteoarthritis than non-runners.  Everything within reason, of course, as the studies also showed that runners training and competing at a very high level for more than 15 years have the same likelihood of developing osteoarthritis as the general population. If I were talented and dedicated enough to be able to compete at such a high level for so long, I’d be happy to take that risk.

 

You need to wear ACTIVEWEAR to exercise – Definitely not.

 

Anything comfortable to move in will work. I’ve been known to get a few exercises done before breakfast in my PJ’s, so no judgement from me! We know everyone loves a good lycra but its about movement not lorna.

 

When you ride with a group you must stop for coffee – full disclosure, I used to ride in a bunch and more often than not we stopped for a coffee, but I’m just saying you don’t have to.

 

You need to be fit to attend an aerobics class (now known as group exercise classes) – the class is how you get fit not the other way round. Stand up the back, do what you can, adlib the rest.  

If you have a sore knee, treat the knee – nope.

 Teknique Health Sarah Healy Ponderings Magazine

Remember that song “the hip bone is connected to the thigh bone, the thigh bone is connected to the knee bone…?” Well, when one area of the body hurts, it is often also influenced by another area. It’s amazing how often my clients with chronic shoulder pain have low back pain as well. Treating one specific area doesn’t address the rest of what is going on in there!

 

Our bodies are very good at compensating and finding the easiest way to do something. If we can’t squeeze our shoulders back, we’ll arch our lower back by tilting our hips to create a similar movement. This compensatory action can create strain or overuse of the lower back muscles.

If you’re not losing weight, your exercise isn’t working – WRONG.

 

There are endless benefits to exercise, and I will gladly list a few for you – improved heart health, lung health and mental health, decreased the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, many cancers. Regular exercise reduces the inflammation in your body, decreasing strain inside and out. There is more, but I have a word limit, you get the point though.

 Want to get in touch with Sarah and find out more about healthy healing? This inspiring human can be found HERE.

Sarah Healy Teknique HealthAbout Sarah Healy:

Exercise Physiologist – AEP AES ESSAM | Bachelor of Applied Science – Human Movement |Graduate Diploma – Exercise for Rehabilitation | Cert IV – Training & Assessment An Exercise Physiologist with over 13 years of experience and has been employed in the sport and fitness industry since 1996. Sarah works with individuals experiencing pain, musculo-skeletal injuries, posture/muscle imbalances and those that have developed anxiety relating to exercise and movement.

 

 

Socks and Sandals To Help The Homeless

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Treaties, Climate Change and the Fight Club of the 2019 Vote

Makarrata, a treaty and 650,000 years of carbon dioxide lead to this moment, a minister walked into the Fight Club of the Australian Election.

At Ponderings, we believe in telling the stories of those who have overcome adversity to achieve positive change and to reflect, to inspire and to prosper.

When a person becomes so impassioned for the justice of others that he leaves the safety of a pulpit and walks into the den of politics- you take a breath in. He is part of our Ponderings community and has rolled up his sleeves and entered the fight club holding a torch. What is he coming with? Climate change, The Uluru Statement from the Heart and voice of the Makarrata.

He is a grandfather, a devoted husband and a beloved minister of the Anglican Parish of Gosford. This is not a man sipping his Grange from a megamansion or a lefty infuriated throwing around restless and careless words. He gives a shit that’s for sure. He set the social media world ablaze and became the talk of the world when he used his church message board on the front lawn to say “Dear Christians, some people are gay, get over it.”

What followed was advocacy and lots of it. Informed, educated, and a whole of fearlessness. It’s not easy standing up for those who need it most. Rod Bower has braved break-ins, had sermons bombarded by white supremacists and death threats come weekly. A minister of the church opening the Sydney Madigras? He’s copped it and still he marches forward.

Fast forward 2 years, and he is the representative for the ICAN party in the Federal Election; Independents for Climate Change Action Now. ICAN is a coalition of independents from across the political spectrum with some specific plans on what needs to happen to give the mechanics of our democratic machine a grease and oil change.

So I asked Father Rod Bower some questions because if you have made it to the top row in the voting ballot, people want to know what the heck you are going with that platform if they vote for you.

What do you hope to achieve once you’re in there?

In the first 100 days, I will help the parliament to declare a Climate Emergency. I will help the parliament to revisit the Uluru Statement from the Heart. This will set the cultural parameters for the term. All legislation must be climate-informed for our children to have a bright future.

Ponderings: The Uluru Statement from the Heart – is a national Indigenous consensus position on Indigenous constitutional recognition, which came out of a convention of 250 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander delegates in 2017.

The Uluru Statement sought a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about indigenous history. Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past.

Why climate change?

In the past 650,000 years, the carbon dioxide Level in the atmosphere has never risen above 300 part per million, with an average of about 200ppm. Today it is over 400ppm.

The planet’s average surface temperature has risen about 0.9 degrees Celsius since the late 19th century, a change driven largely by increased carbon dioxide and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere.

We can mitigate the devastating effect of global warming by becoming a zero-emissions society and by capturing carbon from the atmosphere and storing it the ground and plant life.

In short;

The planet is warming.
We did it.
It’s bad.
We can fix it.

Why is it important to have independents elected?

The two-party system is no longer agile enough to meet the rapidly changing political landscape. The system has become so corrupt that only a solid group of centrist independents will be able to precipitate changes to election donations and establish a Federal ICAC.

How can voting for an independent positively impact government in Australia?

The Gillard Government was one of the most productive in modern Australian history. That is in part, due to Julia Gillard’s excellent negotiating skills but also to the fact that she had a group of sensible independents with which to negotiate. A minority government, where the balance of power is held by productive independents, works well because ideology has to stand aside for practical solutions.

What do you need now to get there?

To win a Senate seat in NSW a candidate requires a quota of 14.5%, that’s a little over 700,000 votes. The more primary votes we get, the more preferences we will attract. So if voters believe that a proper response to climate change is essential and a sustainable society is crucial that they can vote 1 ICAN in the Senate.

Group Q in NSW
Group K in Qld
Group M in Vic

People may not understand the vital importance of independents representing sections of the social fabric of our country in government. They help create a balanced representation, to pass legislation and stop the corruption of our democratic system. It’s a system worth protecting!

If you would like to find out more about the ICAN party and the members, you can click here.

To read about the Uluru Statement of the Heart and Makarrata you can click here and read the statement below.

We, gathered at the 2017 National Constitutional Convention, coming from all points of the southern sky, make this statement from the Heart:
Our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander tribes were the first sovereign Nations of the Australian continent and its adjacent islands, and possessed it under our own laws and customs. This our ancestors did, according to the reckoning of our culture, from the Creation, according to the common law from ‘time immemorial’, and according to science more than 60,000 years ago.
This sovereignty is a spiritual notion: the ancestral tie between the land, or ‘mother nature’, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who were born therefrom, remain attached thereto, and must one day return thither to be united with our ancestors. This link is the basis of the ownership of the soil, or better, of sovereignty. It has never been ceded or extinguished, and co-exists with the sovereignty of the Crown.
How could it be otherwise? That peoples possessed a land for sixty millennia and this sacred link disappears from world history in merely the last two hundred years?
With substantive constitutional change and structural reform, we believe this ancient sovereignty can shine through as a fuller expression of Australia’s nationhood.
Proportionally, we are the most incarcerated people on the planet. We are not an innately criminal people. Our children are aliened from their families at unprecedented rates. This cannot be because we have no love for them. And our youth languish in detention in obscene numbers. They should be our hope for the future.
These dimensions of our crisis tell plainly the structural nature of our problem. This is the torment of our powerlessness.
We seek constitutional reforms to empower our people and take a rightful place in our own country. When we have power over our destiny our children will flourish. They will walk in two worlds, and their culture will be a gift to their country.
We call for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution.
Makarrata is the culmination of our agenda: the coming together after a struggle. It captures our aspirations for a fair and truthful relationship with the people of Australia and a better future for our children based on justice and self-determination.
We seek a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about our history.
In 1967 we were counted, in 2017 we seek to be heard. We leave base camp and start our trek across this vast country. We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

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